Fear The Walking Dead E101 (L.A. Confideadtial: Welcome to Hell, Bitches!)

Fear The Walking Dead E101 (L.A. Confideadtial: Welcome to Hell, Bitches!)

AMC’s Fear The Walking Dead premiered to over 10 million viewers this past weekend. As one of those viewers who was expecting it to be complete shit, it turned out to be a much stronger pilot than the first episode of it’s companion series: The Walking Dead. If that comment made you salty, well then tough shit. This series has a lot more going for it than against it and after five years of perfecting their zombie craft, AMC seems to have another instant classic on their hands.

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“They say it’s not connected. They say that but I don’t believe them. It is. With reports in five states, they don’t know if it’s a virus or a microbe. They don’t know, but it’s spreading. People are killing.”

The pilot episode had a lot to live up to and while comparisons to The Walking Dead are inevitable and to be expected, the creators did a great job of world-building while creating suspense at the same time. The show’s biggest strength is rooted in the fact that we as viewers know more than the characters -playing on our fears as well because we know this is the beginning of the end. It’s because of this that the world seems far more vulnerable than the one we’ve come to know on TWD. This is an interesting contrast because with so many resources readily available, it’s easy to assume these characters have a distinct advantage compared to where Rick and co. are now.  Fear aims to demonstrate the domino effect that would occur from something like a zombie apocalypse without sacrificing storytelling. The series doesn’t seem too concerned with appealing to fans who are undoubtedly butthurt about the lack of action sequences (and Daryl Dixon) but has opted to slowly pull us into this world while allowing it’s characters to develop.  

The Characters

The show centers around a blended family trying to make it “work” or whatever the fuck that means. It’s almost impossible to predict who will be dead by the end of the season but odds are that Madison and Nick will be around for a while. Their the only two characters worth mentioning because the episode was largely carried by them. It should be interesting to see if the end of the world can bring these two closer or drive the family further apart seeing as how Nick is the cause of all the family drama. Like shooting his friend in self defense.

As far as other characters go, they’re all pretty fucking average at best. There’s the daughter who does all the right things but is overshadowed by her drugged out brother, and the new father figure who is trying way too hard to be accepted into the family. Both of these characters could and probably should die as soon as possible so that Madison and Nick can have more screen time. The mother-son dynamic hasn’t been explored very much in this universe in less you considered Lori an actual mother; because I’m sure I could count how many times she showed genuine concern for Carl.

There are many instances of the dead clearly making their presence known but the characters still choose to remain mostly ignorant to what’s happening.  However, thanks to Nick’s big mouth and his drug lord friend not having any of that – it’s not long before the family comes face to face with the reanimated corpse of Nick’s friend, Calvin. And AMC officially has me by the balls once again.

  • In the episode, Travis is teaching a lesson on ‘To Build a Fire” by Jack London. In his lecture he discusses man vs. nature and the changes that come out of that. In season four of The Walking Dead, Rick, Michonne and Carl seek refuge in a house they find after the prison is destroyed. When Michonne and Carl go on a supply run, Rick starts to read a book which happens to be “Call of the Wild” by Jack London. You can read my review on that episode here.